Let's Rock the 1950s

Let's Rock the 1950s

By 1955 Rock and Roll music had surfaced from the swirling pool of blues, country, jazz and boogie styles to eventually dominate the music marketplace. It was like a tsunami. Rock and roll would become a cultural force, beating down racial barriers and splitting generations. It didn’t just influence fashion, it pushed old ideas aside.
Before 1955 ended, the world had heard Bill Haley’s Rock Around the Clock, Little Richard’s Tutti Frutti, and Elvis Presley’s That’s All Right. Black kids and white kids were dancing together. Boys were popping their collars and combing their ducktails; girls were twirling their circle skirts and showing their petticoats. Parents were wondering what the world was coming to.
You can hear what they were hearing and see what they were seeing by using Great River Regional Library’s New, Best & Fun list, Let’s Rock! It will point you at library resources about this fascinating part of our cultural history, now more than 50 years old but still potent.
You’ll find recordings of influential and popular artists of the time like Buddy Holly, The Everly Brothers, and Chuck Berry. We’ve got books that explain the music’s impact, like Rock & Roll Generation: Teen life in the 50s and All Shook Up: How rock ‘n’ roll changed America. We’ve got movies like Grease, Don’t Knock the Rock and Jailhouse Rock, that can put you back in the day.
Watch this list to see new content roll through featuring the 1960s, '70s and more recent decades.
And click on the library catalog's New, Best & Fun tab to find other lists created to help you explore our fabulous collection.