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Kitchen Experiments

What Is Kitchen Chaos?

Kitchen ChaosBelieve it or not, doing science experiments at home can be a lot of fun. And it’s easier than you think: did you know you can concoct a bunch of cool experiments with baking soda, vinegar, cooking oil, salt, lemon juice and other stuff that your mom probably has in the kitchen right now? All it takes is a few good ideas to get you started. So put on your lab coat and get off the couch: you are about to discover all that the kitchen has to offer.

Try these simple experiments to get you started:

Alka-Seltzer Explosion
This experiment should be conducted outside in an open area.

1. Fill a film canister half-full with water.
2. Place ¼ of an Alka-Seltzer tablet inside.
3. Snap the cover on and set it on the ground.
4. Get out of the way, and watch it explode!

Magical Pencil

1. Fill a small plastic zipper bag half-full with water, and seal shut.
2. Use a sharp pencil to quickly poke all the way through the water-filled portion of the bag. Do you think any of the water will leak out?

Now that you are in the scientific mood, start exploring the following websites for some amazing science tricks.

Who doesn’t love a good fake blood recipe? This one is from Steve Spangler, the king of cool science experiments. Check this out:
http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments/fake-blood-recipes

If you have not heard about the Mentos/Diet cola geyser experiment, you are missing out. Watch and learn how easy it is to explode 2 liters of soda in less than 5 seconds.
http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/lab/experiments/homemade-geyser-tube

Remember lava lamps? Here is an easy way to make your own: (Be sure watch the video too.)
http://sciencebob.com/experiments/lavalamp.php

If you try this experiment, you’ll have a great excuse to get your parents to buy you some candy. Really – it’s in the name of science. (This experiment actually calls for Skittles.)
http://www.candyexperiments.com/2009/09/density-rainbow.html